Bio/Contact

I'm married with three children. I live in Northern California surrounded by grapevines and redwood groves. I write mystery, thriller, sci-fi, and fantasy. I enjoy camping, boatbuilding, making wine, restoring classic cars, blacksmithing, and black powder firearms.

You can contact me directly at:
jeramygates@sbcglobal.net

6 comments:

  1. If you enjoy restored classic cars then you really should try to attend "Cruisin' the Coast". Think of a 7days block party from one end of the Gulf Coast in Mississippi to the other end. There is nothing like it. We have classic cars from all over the country. Your '73 Charger would just love to be showed off. Www.cruisinthecoast.com. Kathy Starling owner of K Starling Arts.

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    1. Sadly I don't have the Charger anymore, but I always have my eye out for the next one. Sounds like an awesome cruise. I'd definitely like to check it out some time. Thanks for the head's-up!

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  2. Firstly, thank you for your books... I started reading Tinker's Daughter by fluke through my kindle and have now got some of your other books in the library - can't wait to read them.
    My question - when you're coming up with a new character, what are the questions that you ask them so that you have a clear idea of what/who they are like? I sometimes see them in my mind before writing but they're not always forthcoming about their peccadilloes and wants. Any thoughts/suggestions? Peter (London)

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    1. To be honest, I don't do much outlining on my characters or stories. I probably should, but it seems to work best for me if I leave a lot up to the imagination, letting it work while I'm writing. That being said, I do go into a story with a few general ideas. For a main character, I have in the back of my mind certain life-altering events that helped make this individual unique. Along with this background, comes a sense of emotion(s).

      Since you've read Tinkerer's Daughter, I'll use that as an example. Breeze's background is one of solitude, abandonment, and rejection. Even Tinker is reluctant to take her on. This makes her socially awkward and desperate for acceptance. The fact that she develops certain gifts is really secondary to Breeze. This is simply another avenue to getting the acceptance she craves. And she's relatively fearless because she has already faced her fears. Some might even say she's a little reckless...

      Of course, a character like this must eventually achieve some or all of her goals, and then you have to decide if this character has the depth to be a hero all over again with a new set of challenges. (In other words, is it time for a new series? lol)

      At any rate, that's my very long-winded answer. To sum it up: Every character has a past. The high points and low points -and the character's reactions to those- are the individual's defining moments. One set of events may create a hero in one person or a villain in another. If you know what those events were and how your character reacted, you really do know your character inside and out. What flavor of coffee he or she prefers is arbitrary.

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  3. I just finished your Clockwork Legion book...I started with Tinkerer’s Daughter and could not stop! I enjoy your writing style and your version of the steampunk genre...not all are to my taste. I am hoping you will tell me that another book in the Aboard the Iron Horse series is coming...I don’t want to be left hanging! Once again, it has been a pleasure to read your books and I plan on checking out your fantasy detective series.

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    1. Hi Sherri. I'm thrilled that you enjoy these books and yes, there is definitely another coming soon. I hope to have it out by the end of the year, but in the worst case it should be out by spring 2018. Definitely take a look at my Hank Mossberg series! I think you'll find there's nothing else like it out there. Of all my characters, Hank has some of the most dedicated fans.

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